Author Topic: CG's Home Projects  (Read 17530 times)

comrade_general

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CG's Home Projects
« on: August 27, 2012, 01:45:22 AM »
I decided this is enough for a new topic. Perhaps if I do more things I'll make this my "project" thread. To the point! -->

What to do on a weekend alone?? Well, for someone like me it is to first start off by attempting the construction of a composite bow. Unfortunately I don't have any animal horn on hand, so what to use instead? PVC pipe! Yeah maybe that will work. So I didn't have any flat pieces of that, only pipes, which are curved. My brain came up with a scheme to cut a section out of a pipe, heat it, and then flatten it out. So I started a fire and got to work. Success! The only part of this endeavor which worked! :P To make the rest of this story short; the epoxy I used sucked and didn't bond the plastic to the wood, plus the wood snapped, and the handle I tried to cut out came out all crooked. Thus ended that project. Funny thing is I knew in the back of my head that it would never work, but I do, or rather attempt to do, things like this all the time. Crap, I still haven't come to the point. Here it is...

The Point

So started my second undertaking - an arrow. Sorry I don't have pictures of each step, in retrospect I wish I had better documented the whole process.

I have a longbow, as some of you know, so I already have arrows. But I lost one of them the other day at the range, so I thought what the hey I'll make another, the old way.

I first headed off towards the neighbors because they have some nice pines growing along the road which I had remembered to be very straight and narrow. But the only decent pieces I could find were all dead and crumbly and not long enough for what I needed. Then I came upon a small patch of Sassafras saplings. Hm, interesting. How nice and straight they were, and of good length. So I broke one off at it's base and took it home.

It was your typical sapling; kinda wavy and bigger at the bottom than at the top. The first step was to peel the bark off. Naturally it didn't want to cooperate and peel nicely off so I had to use my knife to scrape the bark off, being careful not to slice the thing in half. Once that was done I whittled down some of the bigger end to make it more uniform.

I had read about straightening arrows with heat at Primitive Ways, and with my fire already burning, I did just this. The stick was heated over the flames and gently pushed into shape between my hand and a rock.

It was later in the day by then, so I tied the stick to one of my other arrows so that it stayed straight and let it sit overnight. The next morning I let it sit out in the sun for a few hours while I went out and did some creek fishing just to see what I'd get (when you're in the outdoor mood right?). Then it was time for more work.

I started by eyeballing out where I wanted the string nock and arrowhead to go. I had made a flint arrowhead so I knew what kind of space I'd need for that. Oh right, the arrowhead. I had made that somewhere in that space of time, after breaking the first two that is. But with various tools I was able to make a nice nock and a space for the point. These parts I heat treated in the fire and then painted with a coat of wood glue.

Next I inserted the flint into it's place with some glue and wrapped it to the shaft with kite string (err I mean sinew ;)). This was painted with a mixture of wood glue and liquid pigment. While this dried I cut to rough shape some turkey feathers (that I'd had laying around for years) for the fletching. The feathers were glued on and, using the string and glue technique, were secured to the shaft.

Finally I gave the remaining naked wood parts a quick coat of lacquer. Then the whole thing was left to dry while I went out and tried to find some wild ginseng (outdoors whoo!). Several hours later I trimmed the fletching to a nice shape. Done!
Pictures!

The finished arrow:


Closeups of the point and nock (notice the "cock" feather (don't laugh children) is of different color than the other two, which are striped, because it sits at a right angle to the nock).


The fletching has a nice natural curve to it.


Believe me it wasn't this straight when I started.


Here it is with a couple of my other arrows. Nice. It's center of gravity is even very similar to them.


I'm a little apprehensive about shooting it, for fear that it will just fly apart. :P
And I must say this is one of the best looking things that I've ever made.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 03:12:35 PM by comrade_general »
I'd be more apathetic if I weren't so lethargic.

Jubal

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Re: The Point
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2012, 11:00:54 AM »
Looks great! What did you use to work/knap the flint in terms of tools?
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comrade_general

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Re: The Point
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2012, 08:48:22 PM »
A screwdriver and a leather glove. ;)
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Ashanorath

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Re: The Point
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2012, 11:02:48 PM »
Good job CG. It looks realy good. Just one thing, as far as I know, drying wood on direct sunlight is never a good idea cause it makes wood more rigid and brakeable. Keeping it in shade is better. It's not a big deal with arrow but remember it if you plan doing something bigger, like composite bow parts or longbow. And again, really nice work on that arrow. I might pay you to make few for my bow(once it's complete).
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comrade_general

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Re: The Point
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2012, 11:43:16 PM »
Thanks for the tip, and yeah, keep me in mind. ;)
I'd be more apathetic if I weren't so lethargic.

comrade_general

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Re: The Point
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2012, 11:23:01 PM »
My father finally found an antique double-barrel shotgun that he used to hunt rabbits with as a kid, so I wanted to give him a nice way to display it.



The wood is all natural pieces collected on our land, the antler bits were from a shedding that was found in our neighbors woods, and the backing is faux rabbit fur.
These were taken with my cellular device so I apologize for the poor image quality.
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Captain Carthage

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Re: The Point
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2012, 07:56:30 AM »
A sexy stand for a sexy peace of hardware, good work C_G.
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Jubal

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Re: The Point
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2012, 11:03:40 AM »
It's a neat piece of work.
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comrade_general

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Re: The Point
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2012, 11:59:39 AM »
Why thank you. :)
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Skull

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Re: The Point
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2012, 06:47:27 PM »
Well,that arrow does look great,but the stone point doesn't really look that dangerous... :)
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Jubal

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Re: The Point
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2012, 09:09:49 PM »
You'd be surprised, stone keeps an edge very well, and flint in particular. The arrowhead here doesn't look that neat, but it's probably like many other early tools in that respect (it's also white flint, which I believe is inferior to black flint in this respect). I still wouldn't want to be shot with it, put it that way.
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comrade_general

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Re: CG's Home Projects
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2013, 01:13:47 PM »
Currently working on a shadow box. Progress is slow.
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comrade_general

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Re: CG's Home Projects
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2014, 03:40:11 PM »
Have purchased a muzzleloader kit and plan to refinish a couple other firearms. I'll try to get some pictures and keep you all updated on progress. :)
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comrade_general

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Re: CG's Home Projects
« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2014, 06:22:01 PM »
Alright, here's the kit I got. It's for a .50 caliber Kentucky style rifle. They only had kits with a percussion cap lock but I also got a flintlock that I'm going to modify onto this one. You can also see the deluxe gun restoration kit I got.


Before getting to that kit though I'm going to fix up the other two muzzleloaders I have. The first being another Kentucky style percussion lock in .45 caliber. It was a kit that my grandfather put together. The second was also a kit he did and is a little .45 percussion cap derringer. I should have gotten a picture of them before dis-assembly, but just imagine two muzzleloaders with too light of a finish, dulled-out bronze pieces, and somewhat-sloppily-shaped wood. After taking everything apart I started by stripping all the wood parts with citric acid and mineral spirits to remove the finish and most of the old stain and set them out to dry after a good rinse.

I'd be more apathetic if I weren't so lethargic.

comrade_general

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Re: CG's Home Projects
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2014, 10:33:39 PM »
Started working on the little guy first. First step was fixing the inletting for the lock because, as the following picture shows, the lock did not seat flush with the stock.


Also in that photo you can see the trigger assembly (sans the trigger) being flush to the bottom of the stock when it should be seated far enough inside so that the brass trigger guard will fit on top of it. But once I got those fitted it became evident that I needed to remove a lot of wood to flush certain parts of the stock to the trigger assembly, as seen below.


I got the lock seated nicely, which makes it sit closer to the barrel and lines up the hammer a lot better over the nipple, as seen in the left photo. On the right you can see the stock is now flush with the trigger assembly.


This is how it looks now, still sans the trigger and barrel retaining pin. I'll have to drill a new hole and find a new screw for the back part of the lock because the old screw is broke off inside. There is also a large gap between the bottom of the brass trigger guard and the stock which was already gone when I started, so I might have to use some wood putty on that spot.


All in all it's looking a lot better.
I'd be more apathetic if I weren't so lethargic.