Author Topic: History yays  (Read 38264 times)

dubsartur

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Re: History yays
« Reply #105 on: September 19, 2023, 09:44:01 PM »

Glaurung

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Re: History yays
« Reply #106 on: September 20, 2023, 10:00:31 AM »
Ooh, I did not know about this - thanks for posting!

dubsartur

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Re: History yays
« Reply #107 on: October 06, 2023, 06:31:15 AM »
For a long time there has been an argument whether the Clovis Culture were the first humans in the Americas.  As a non specialists it seems very partisan and motivated with defenders of Clovis getting increasingly desperate because if they accept one piece of evidence as "maybe" then it will get hard to dismiss the next as "unprecedented." (Although some of the alternative theories are pretty dodgy too).  Ordinary people in Iron Age Ireland are basically invisible to archaeologists, it must be even harder to spot people ten times as old who did not have copper or draft animals.

Ars Technica has a piece on some of the latest evidence, carbon-dated human footprints at the White Sands missile range in the USA https://arstechnica.com/science/2023/10/theres-more-evidence-that-people-walked-at-white-sands-23000-years-ago/
« Last Edit: October 06, 2023, 06:42:20 AM by dubsartur »

Jubal

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Re: History yays
« Reply #108 on: December 20, 2023, 11:57:27 PM »
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-67755415

This is immensely clever and very exciting work - using tooth remains to analyse diet over time, so you can actually prove that, as in this case, someone of Sarmatian ancestry found buried in Roman era Britain didn't just have ancestors from abroad but actually travelled and thus changed grains and diet during his lifetime.

I think some historical DNA/science work can end up being reductive because people want to categorise too much by what they find (or read DNA into social categories it doesn't reflect) but this sort of work I think does show some really interesting potential in unlocking some evidence of people's life stories etc.
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